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FDA approves Cinqair to treat severe asthma

FDA approves Cinqair to treat severe asthma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Cinqair (reslizumab) for use with other asthma medicines for the maintenance treatment of severe asthma in patients aged 18 years and older. Cinqair is approved for patients who have a history of severe asthma attacks (exacerbations) despite receiving their current asthma medicines.

Cinqair is administered once every four weeks via intravenous infusion by a health care professional in a clinical setting prepared to manage anaphylaxis.

Cinqair is a humanized interleukin-5 antagonist monoclonal antibody produced by recombinant DNA technology in murine myeloma non-secreting 0 (NS0) cells.

 

Cinqair reduces severe asthma attacks by reducing the levels of blood eosinophils, a type of white blood cell that contributes to the development of asthma.

Compared with placebo, patients with severe asthma receiving Cinqair had fewer asthma attacks, and a longer time to the first attack. In addition, treatment with Cinqair resulted in a significant improvement in lung function, as measured by the volume of air exhaled by patients in one second.

Cinqair can cause serious side effects including allergic (hypersensitivity) reactions. These reactions can be life-threatening. The most common side effects in clinical trials for Cinqair included anaphylaxis, cancer, and muscle pain.

 

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Crash Risk Soars When Truck Drivers Don’t Treat Sleep Apnea

Crash Risk Soars When Truck Drivers Don’t Treat Sleep Apnea

The study was published online March 21 in the journal Sleep.

“The most surprising result of our study is the strength and robustness of the increase in the crash risk for drivers with sleep apnea who fail to adhere to mandated treatment with positive airway pressure therapy [CPAP],” said study author Stephen Burks. He’s principal investigator of the Truckers & Turnover Project at the University of Minnesota.

The rate of serious, preventable crashes was five times higher among truckers with sleep apnea who didn’t use their CPAP machine, compared to the control group. The crash rate among drivers with sleep apnea who always or sometimes used their CPAP machine was similar to that of the control group.

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Flu Vaccine Nearly 60 Percent Effective 2015-2016 Season

Flu Vaccine Nearly 60 Percent Effective 2015-2016 Season

Flu Vaccine Nearly 60 Percent Effective 2015-2016 Season

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today reported preliminary overall influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) of 59 percent this season. These data were presented at a meeting of the agency’s Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) in Atlanta. This finding is comparable to past estimates for seasons when most circulating flu viruses and vaccine viruses have been similar.

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CDC Says Cigarette Smoking At An All-Time Low Among American Adults

CDC Says Cigarette Smoking At An All-Time Low Among American Adults

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control said Tuesday that “cigarette smoking is at an all-time low” as “only 15.3% of American adults now light up — down from 16.8% in 2014 and 24.7% in 1997.” According to experts, “Americans are butting out because of the high cost of cigarettes and thanks to fewer legal places to smoke.” Also people are more aware of the danger associated with smoking like COPD, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, heart attacks, strokes and so many other diseases.

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A Third of U.S. Adults Not Getting Enough Sleep

A Third of U.S. Adults Not Getting Enough Sleep

One third of U.S. adults — or an estimated 84 million — aren’t getting the recommended 7 or more hours of sleep each day, according to an MMWR article.

Using data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC researchers examined the sleep habits of nearly 450,000 adults. Among the other findings:

  • Adults aged 65 and older were the most likely to report getting enough sleep (74%), while those aged 25–44 were the least likely (62%).

  • When examined by race, sufficient sleep was most common among whites (67%) and least common among blacks and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders (54%).

  • People in South Dakota slept the most, while those in Hawaii slept the least.

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Smokers not eligible for CT screening under NLST guidelines may have same rate of cancers as those who are eligible

Smokers not eligible for CT screening under NLST guidelines may have same rate of cancers as those who are eligible

Long-term smokers who are at high risk for lung cancer but don’t qualify for CT screening under the strict guidelines of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) nevertheless have the same rate of cancers as those who do qualify.

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Whooping cough vaccine less effective over time for middle school children

Whooping cough vaccine less effective over time for middle school children

A new study was published in the journal Pediatrics indicates “the protection offered by middle-school whooping cough vaccines fades with each passing year, leaving teens vulnerable to infection as they age.

The study, found that “the shot protects 69% of 11- and 12-year-old in the first year after vaccination, but within four years, just 9% of these children have sufficient protection from the infection.”

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